About Us

Background

Robin and Joyce Hill outsideDr. Joyce Hill, a family medical practitioner, and her husband, Robin, began with a desire to help the Child Welfare Institutes in China in the work that they do caring for abandoned babies. The Hills have done this by providing personal care and seeking medical treatment for sick children, surgical interventions for those with correctable needs, and loving care for those requiring a palliative approach.

The Hills are Christians and believe that these children are very special to God. The Hills came to China with their two youngest (of seven) children in 1994. They also adopted a special-needs little girl, now called Kaitlyn Jayne, who was born in Tianjin in August 1999.

Robin, a British citizen, worked for a Swedish engineering company as one of their senior managers. Joyce, an Australian citizen, worked with the medical clinic at International SOS in Beijing as a family doctor. After being in China for four years, Robin resigned from his company with twenty years of service to help his wife set up a foster home.

Small Beginnings

With permission from the Beijing Child Welfare Institute, the Hills began taking children into their home in February 2000 in a small village southeast of Beijing. In November 2002, they started work on what would become New Hope Foundation’s Hope Healing Home in Beiwu, in the Shunyi district of Beijing. This new home cared for 26 babies at that time. This was done under New Hope Foundation Limited, which is a registered charity in Hong Kong and is wholly owned by Robin and Joyce Hill. In February 2003, New Hope Foundation began to support Sai Qi Foster Home, run by Ms. Xu, by raising funds and arranging for medical care for their children. This was handed over to Harvard China Care after approximately 18 months. Starting in 2004, the Outreach Foster Program, in conjunction with Love Without Boundaries, helped to extend the care of the children by placing them into local Chinese family homes. This program continued for the next eight years.

The Work Expands

In January 2005, New Hope Foundation opened a palliative care unit in Jiaozuo, Henan Province. This unit was designed to care for up to 36 babies who were severely disabled and not expected to live. The goal was “to comfort always, to relieve often, and to save sometimes.” In September 2006, New Hope Foundation opened its second palliative care unit in Luoyang, also in the Henan Province. This unit was designed to care for up to 45 babies who, as in Jiaozuo, had significant medical conditions and were in need of palliative care.

map of china with cities in which NHF has care centersIn October 2006, in conjunction with Love Without Boundaries, a small nine-bed “step-up, step-down” unit was opened. This unit was inside the New Hope Foundation Hope Healing Home and was called the “Heartbridge Unit.” It was used to care for medically vulnerable infants immediately following surgery, as well as those children awaiting surgery. During 2007, this was increased to 18 beds. The Xinyang Special Care Unit also opened in October 2007. This unit also cared for up to 18 babies with severe disabilities, many of whom were not expected to live. The babies who came into the unit were comforted and fed, and if they did not survive, they passed away in a loving environment. The babies who survived were cared for in the chronic care areas and received the very best care and physical therapy possible.

In 2009, with the generous help of Show Hope, a six-story, 5,820-square-meter facility opened as part of the Chinese government’s Blue Sky Project with the goal of upgrading the Luoyang Child Welfare Institute’s facilities. Maria’s Big House of Hope in Luoyang initially cared for 140 babies in three groups: palliative care, long-term chronic care, and operable conditions. In August 2010, again with support from Show Hope, a unit was opened inside theZhengzhou Child Welfare Institute. By year’s end, the Zhengzhou location was caring for 45 babies. A new floor was added in 2014, allowing for 105 beds at full capacity.

July 2011 saw New Hope Foundation being allowed to register a Representative Office with the China Ministry of Civil Affairs, putting the organization in a strong position going forward. We are extremely grateful for this opportunity to be working with the Civil Affairs Office.

In July 2015, a unit was opened in Nanyang with the help of Show Hope to care for 36 babies. As in the units that came before it, these children have had severe medical conditions, and some were not expected to live.

The Next Chapters

During 2016, it became necessary to reduce the size of some of the centers in Henan Province due to funding constraints. The unit in Xinyang was closed, and since the Jiaozuo location had a very low admission rate, it was reduced from 36 beds to 12. Maria’s Big House of Hope in Luoyang was restricted to housing children only on the first three floors due to revised fire regulations.

When new regulations began to affect the whole of China in 2019, New Hope Foundation was no longer able to care for children in the Beijing Hope Healing Home. All the children were required to leave, and the facility continued to function as the main administrative office.

The Hope Continues

Dr. Steve Martin with three children in BeijingIn early 2020, New Hope Foundation experienced several significant changes. Founders Dr. Joyce and Robin Hill retired to Australia, and Dr. Steve Martin began leading New Hope Foundation as the new CEO in January of 2020. Originally a family practice physician from Texas, he moved with his family to China in 2010 to help Dr. Joyce care for the children.

In addition to a shift in leadership, the COVID-19 pandemic meant that basic daily care with minimum staff movements became normal operating practices for most of 2020. Fortunately, no staff or child with New Hope Foundation contracted Covid-19 during this time.

Show Hope completed its financial commitment to New Hope Foundation in the summer of 2020, and we are exceedingly thankful for the years of support and partnership with them. Generous supporters have since helped New Hope Foundation continue to be able to operate.

With several considerable changes in 2020, it is by God’s grace the work of New Hope Foundation continues. Wonderful staff, priceless children, and generous supporters all contribute to our hope not only of continuing but of being able to care for even more children in the years to come as God wills.

With more funding and prayer support, we are in a position to be able to care for more children. Please join us by donating and/or praying.

The New Hope Foundation vision is:

 

|  To comfort always, to relieve often, and to save sometimes.  |

 

  • To take in orphaned infants and children with special physical and medical needs and provide them with a caring and secure environment in as close to a normal home environment as possible,
  • to work closely with the local Child Welfare Institutes to seek out the very best medical solution for each child’s physical challenge and facilitate their treatment in order to give these children the very best opportunities for the future,
  • to employ and train local staff, as well as work closely with the local community to help support the staff’s needs, to provide appropriate opportunities for volunteers to be involved,
  • and to keep accurate records of the children’s development so that each has a written history.

 

Key Success Factors

Bonding: Each nanny cares for the same three children each day or night. This allows for normal emotional bonding to occur.

Responsibility: Nannies have the complete responsibility of feeding, bathing and playing with their children. They are also trained to give prescribed medicines.

Training: Nannies are carefully trained using the New Hope Foundation guidelines for looking after the children. We recognize that these, at times, can be very different from local or individuals’ methods. It is stressed that the New Hope Foundation way is not necessarily the only method or better than other methods, but that it is just the uniform way that these children will be treated so that their routines do not change.

Working Hours: Staff working hours are set so that the staff can give the very best attention to the children in their care.

Dr. Steve and nurses at workFacilities: The facilities in all centers are bright, colorful, and clean, with both spacious play areas and bedrooms for the children. Play areas are kept separate from dining areas. All children have their own personal towels and clothing selected especially for them by their nannies.

Treating medical problems: An isolation area for sick children is mandatory to help control the spread of infection. Good, regular sterilization routines are adhered to as well. On-site medical staff are available to deal with simple medical problems that arise, and to do routine health checks.

How We Do Things

The policies on this page have developed since the year 2000 as we have striven for excellence in caring for the children entrusted to us.

These policies are published on this website so that others can see what we have found to work well in our Hope Healing Homes. They are in both English and Chinese. If you find them helpful, you may copy and modify to suit your own circumstances. We hold no ownership or liability on these ideas; we do believe, however, that the fingerprints of God are all over them.

 

Philosophy and Practice
English PDFChinese PDF

Child Protection Policy for New Hope Foundation Ltd:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

Baby Care Policy:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

Nannies’ Duties:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

New Hope Foundation Financials

NHF Financial Report Consolidated 2018-2019 (PDF, 219 KB)

If you would like more detailed information, please contact info@newhope.foundation.

With Appreciation

We wish to sincerely thank all those sponsors and friends who have helped us in the past and those who will continue to do so into the future:

 

 

 

Robin and Joyce Hill outside

Background

Dr. Joyce Hill, a family medical practitioner, and her husband, Robin, began with a desire to help the Child Welfare Institutes in China in the work that they do caring for abandoned babies. The Hills have done this by providing personal care and seeking medical treatment for sick children, surgical interventions for those with correctable needs, and loving care for those requiring a palliative approach.

The Hills are Christians and believe that these children are very special to God. The Hills came to China with their two youngest (of seven) children in 1994. They also adopted a special-needs little girl, now called Kaitlyn Jayne, who was born in Tianjin in August 1999.

Robin, a British citizen, worked for a Swedish engineering company as one of their senior managers. Joyce, an Australian citizen, worked with the medical clinic at International SOS in Beijing as a family doctor. After being in China for four years, Robin resigned from his company with twenty years of service to help his wife set up a foster home.

Small Beginnings

With permission from the Beijing Child Welfare Institute, the Hills began taking children into their home in February 2000 in a small village southeast of Beijing. In November 2002, they started work on what would become New Hope Foundation’s Hope Healing Home in Beiwu, in the Shunyi district of Beijing. This new home cared for 26 babies at that time. This was done under New Hope Foundation Limited, which is a registered charity in Hong Kong and is wholly owned by Robin and Joyce Hill. In February 2003, New Hope Foundation began to support Sai Qi Foster Home, run by Ms. Xu, by raising funds and arranging for medical care for their children. This was handed over to Harvard China Care after approximately 18 months. Starting in 2004, the Outreach Foster Program, in conjunction with Love Without Boundaries, helped to extend the care of the children by placing them into local Chinese family homes. This program continued for the next eight years.

The Work Expands

In January 2005, New Hope Foundation opened a palliative care unit in Jiaozuo, Henan Province. This unit was designed to care for up to 36 babies who were severely disabled and not expected to live. The goal was “to comfort always, to relieve often, and to save sometimes.” In September 2006, New Hope Foundation opened its second palliative care unit in Luoyang, also in the Henan Province. This unit was designed to care for up to 45 babies who, as in Jiaozuo, had significant medical conditions and were in need of palliative care.

map of china with cities in which NHF has care centersIn October 2006, in conjunction with Love Without Boundaries, a small nine-bed “step-up, step-down” unit was opened. This unit was inside the New Hope Foundation Hope Healing Home and was called the “Heartbridge Unit.” It was used to care for medically vulnerable infants immediately following surgery, as well as those children awaiting surgery. During 2007, this was increased to 18 beds. The Xinyang Special Care Unit also opened in October 2007. This unit also cared for up to 18 babies with severe disabilities, many of whom were not expected to live. The babies who came into the unit were comforted and fed, and if they did not survive, they passed away in a loving environment. The babies who survived were cared for in the chronic care areas and received the very best care and physical therapy possible.

In 2009, with the generous help of Show Hope, a six-story, 5,820-square-meter facility opened as part of the Chinese government’s Blue Sky Project with the goal of upgrading the Luoyang Child Welfare Institute’s facilities. Maria’s Big House of Hope in Luoyang initially cared for 140 babies in three groups: palliative care, long-term chronic care, and operable conditions. In August 2010, again with support from Show Hope, a unit was opened inside theZhengzhou Child Welfare Institute. By year’s end, the Zhengzhou location was caring for 45 babies. A new floor was added in 2014, allowing for 105 beds at full capacity.

July 2011 saw New Hope Foundation being allowed to register a Representative Office with the China Ministry of Civil Affairs, putting the organization in a strong position going forward. We are extremely grateful for this opportunity to be working with the Civil Affairs Office.

In July 2015, a unit was opened in Nanyang with the help of Show Hope to care for 36 babies. As in the units that came before it, these children have had severe medical conditions, and some were not expected to live.

The Next Chapters

During 2016, it became necessary to reduce the size of some of the centers in Henan Province due to funding constraints. The unit in Xinyang was closed, and since the Jiaozuo location had a very low admission rate, it was reduced from 36 beds to 12. Maria’s Big House of Hope in Luoyang was restricted to housing children only on the first three floors due to revised fire regulations.

When new regulations began to affect the whole of China in 2019, New Hope Foundation was no longer able to care for children in the Beijing Hope Healing Home. All the children were required to leave, and the facility continued to function as the main administrative office.

Dr. Steve Martin with three children in Beijing

The Hope Continues

In early 2020, New Hope Foundation experienced several significant changes. Founders Dr. Joyce and Robin Hill retired to Australia, and Dr. Steve Martin began leading New Hope Foundation as the new CEO in January of 2020. Originally a family practice physician from Texas, he moved with his family to China in 2010 to help Dr. Joyce care for the children.

In addition to a shift in leadership, the COVID-19 pandemic meant that basic daily care with minimum staff movements became normal operating practices for most of 2020. Fortunately, no staff or child with New Hope Foundation contracted Covid-19 during this time.

Show Hope completed its financial commitment to New Hope Foundation in the summer of 2020, and we are exceedingly thankful for the years of support and partnership with them. Generous supporters have since helped New Hope Foundation continue to be able to operate.

With several considerable changes in 2020, it is by God’s grace the work of New Hope Foundation continues. Wonderful staff, priceless children, and generous supporters all contribute to our hope not only of continuing but of being able to care for even more children in the years to come as God wills.

With more funding and prayer support, we are in a position to be able to care for more children. Please join us by donating and/or praying.

The New Hope Foundation vision is:

 

|  To comfort always, to relieve often, and to save sometimes.  |

 

  • To take in orphaned infants and children with special physical and medical needs and provide them with a caring and secure environment in as close to a normal home environment as possible,
  • to work closely with the local Child Welfare Institutes to seek out the very best medical solution for each child’s physical challenge and facilitate their treatment in order to give these children the very best opportunities for the future,
  • to employ and train local staff, as well as work closely with the local community to help support the staff’s needs, to provide appropriate opportunities for volunteers to be involved,
  • and to keep accurate records of the children’s development so that each has a written history.

 

Key Success Factors

Bonding: Each nanny cares for the same three children each day or night. This allows for normal emotional bonding to occur.

Responsibility: Nannies have the complete responsibility of feeding, bathing and playing with their children. They are also trained to give prescribed medicines.

Training: Nannies are carefully trained using the New Hope Foundation guidelines for looking after the children. We recognize that these, at times, can be very different from local or individuals’ methods. It is stressed that the New Hope Foundation way is not necessarily the only method or better than other methods, but that it is just the uniform way that these children will be treated so that their routines do not change.

Working Hours: Staff working hours are set so that the staff can give the very best attention to the children in their care.

Dr. Steve and nurses at work

Facilities: The facilities in all centers are bright, colorful, and clean, with both spacious play areas and bedrooms for the children. Play areas are kept separate from dining areas. All children have their own personal towels and clothing selected especially for them by their nannies.

Treating medical problems: An isolation area for sick children is mandatory to help control the spread of infection. Good, regular sterilization routines are adhered to as well. On-site medical staff are available to deal with simple medical problems that arise, and to do routine health checks.

How We Do Things

The policies on this page have developed since the year 2000 as we have striven for excellence in caring for the children entrusted to us.

These policies are published on this website so that others can see what we have found to work well in our Hope Healing Homes. They are in both English and Chinese. If you find them helpful, you may copy and modify to suit your own circumstances. We hold no ownership or liability on these ideas; we do believe, however, that the fingerprints of God are all over them.

 

Philosophy and Practice
English PDFChinese PDF

Child Protection Policy for New Hope Foundation Ltd:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

Baby Care Policy:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

Nannies’ Duties:
English PDF / Chinese PDF

New Hope Foundation Financials

NHF Financial Report Consolidated 2018-2019 (PDF, 219 KB)

If you would like more detailed information, please contact info@newhope.foundation.

With Appreciation

We wish to sincerely thank all those sponsors and friends who have helped us in the past and those who will continue to do so into the future:

 

Donate

Your contributions make quality care for orphaned children possible. Donations of any amount are appreciated and vital to our ongoing work. New Hope Foundation is 100% privately funded by donors like you!

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